Homemade Bunting DIY- renter friendly decor!

Handmade bunting makes a really unique and beautiful addition to any home. Great for renters, this bunting can be stuck up with blu tac!

Hi guys! Today’s post is my DIY bunting. I LOVE bunting. Seriously, love the stuff. I’ve got it in my bedroom, the kitchen, the garden, on the wall, in the window… you get the idea.

I think bunting is a great, cheap way of adding character to any space. I love the vintage look and feel of bunting, and it’s ability to transform a room. For me, it creates a festive and homely atmosphere- plus its renter friendly! I use blu tac when I’m at uni to stick bunting up on my walls to help make my room feel like home.

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Working in a fabric shop, I often get asked for suggestions on easy sewing projects for beginners, and I always respond with bunting. It’s a really simple but rewarding DIY, perfect for people who are just getting to grips with a sewing machine.

If you fancy giving it a go yourself, find my step by step instructions below!

You will need (for a 2m length of bunting) : 

  • Assorted fabric. The bunting featured in this post was made using five different fabrics; use what you have in or purchase quarter of a metre lengths of each. This will give you more than enough fabric to produce two metres of bunting. 
  • 2.5m of Bias Binding or ribbon.
  • A sewing machine.
  • Matching thread.
  • Fabric Scissors.
  • Greaseproof paper, card or similar to cut a template out of.P1230233

I purchase all of my fabric from The Buttonhole, my place of work. They offer a great selection and also international delivery on all of their fabrics. All fabric featured in this post and my other DIYs is sourced from The Buttonhole.

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What to do:

  1. Cut out a template for your bunting. An equilateral triangle of approximately 6″ by 10″ will do the job, or scale to your own requirements depending on what you want your final bunting to look like. P1230286.jpg
  2. Pin your template to each of your fabrics in turn and cut around. To make a 2m stretch of bunting you will require around ten flags, this means you will need to cut twenty triangles. Note: Two triangles makes ONE bunting flag. You will see why in the next step.
  3. Place two matching triangles right sides together, that is, with the correct sides of the fabric facing each other. Pin down the two long edges of the triangle before machine stitching down these edges, leaving the top open. Tip: By pinning perpendicular to the edge of the fabric as shown below, you can sew over you pins with your machine without breaking the needle.P1230297.jpg
  4. Turn your flag the correct way around and press with an iron. Repeat this method until you have created all your flags.
  5. Fold the two raw edges at the top of you flag inside the flag to create a neat edge, press and machine stitch into place.
  6. You are now ready to attach your ribbon or bias binding. If you wish to use bias binding and would like to know how to do this, please refer to this blog post where I explain in detail how to attach bias binding to your projects. If using ribbon, place the top of your flag just behind the ribbon and machine stitch into place.
  7. Repeat this, spacing out your flags evenly along the length of your bunting until all have been sewed on!P1230300

That’s it! Congratulations on your new bunting! I hope you guys enjoyed this post and maybe it inspired you to get crafty! Have you got any renter friendly DIY decor ideas? Let me know! It’s always great to discover new ways of decorating my student halls.

Best wishes to you all!

Maddie x

How I attach Bias Binding

resolutions

Hey guys! It’s finally Friday! I’m afraid that due to a very hectic working day today I haven’t had chance to put together my usual projects for the weekend post, I have however got a small post for all you sewing enthusiasts out there! If sewing’s not really your thing, why not check out some of my previous posts for some weekend inspiration?

So you may have seen my recent post about my battle with my gran’s blanket. If you didn’t, why haven’t you been keeping up to date with my blog?! Jokes, thanks for being here now! But if you did you will know all about my struggle of bias binding the edges of said blanket.

After publishing that post it occurred to me that some of my readers wouldn’t know what bias binding was, and also some of you would probably like to know how to use it! Hence today’s post: How I attach bias binding. I called this post ‘How I attach bias binding’ rather than ‘How to attach bias binding’ as I’ve never actually been shown how other people do this. I’ve just sort of tried a few different techniques over the years and eventually found one that works for me, which is what I’ll be sharing with you today.

So what is bias binding? 

Bias binding is something used for covering up raw edges when sewing garments or things like quilts. Its basically a strip of fabric with the two edges folded in and is bought on a roll, kind of like a cotton ribbon with the two edges folded over.

How do you attach it?

Well I can’t speak for everyone else, but this is how I attach bias binding to my projects.

  1. Fold the bias in half lengthways and press it with an iron. When you have done this you will have three folds in your binding, the two it is purchased with and then the one you have just added.
  2. Pin your bias along one of the outer folds to the raw edge of your fabric as shown below. I was adding the bias binding to a blanket that had started to fray at the edges, hence the mess poking out from behind my bias! Not to worry, all this will be encompassed by the bias binding once we have attached it 🙂P1220938
  3. Machine stitch along the fold where you have pinned.P1220941
  4. Fold the bias over the raw edge of your fabric, encompassing the edge. You want the centre fold that you have pressed into the bias to be on the edge of the fabric. Pin this into place as shown.P1220940
  5. You can see now that you have two neat edges on either side of your bias binding, exactly what we wanted! Machine stitch close to the edge.P1220942

There you have it! My way of applying bias binding. I’ve used this technique to edge a quilt and also to make bunting; two projects that I will be sharing with you in future blog posts!

I hope this may have been of some help for those of you wanting to try out something new with your sewing! Leave any questions or comments below!

Best wishes to you all,

Maddie.

Dress making!

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Today I picked up a new dress pattern from work! For those of you who don’t know, I work in a local fabric shop when I’m back from uni. As you can imagine, it’s pretty much a dream part time job for a sewing lover like me. Being constantly surrounded by beautiful fabrics is such a wonderful source of inspiration, though it can mean that I’ve spent my wages before I’ve left work sometimes!

But seriously, having the opportunity to work with women who know so much about sewing is something that I’ll forever be grateful for. I always used to feel a bit intimidated by sewing, especially dressmaking. It felt like everyone was talking in their own language when it came to things like sewing patterns and different types of fabric, and this was pretty scary for fourteen year old me! I’ve since come to learn that sewing is something to be enjoyed, an experience that should be a creative outlet for you! It really doesn’t matter if you don’t know what that fabric you like is called, if you like it and you think it’ll sew nicely, who cares?!

The most important thing I’ve learnt during my time working at the shop is to RELAX. Sewing’s a hobby! It should be fun. Don’t feel embarrassed if you don’t know what type of interfacing you need to use, or what the difference between a concealed zip and a regular zip is. The truth is, we all didn’t know that at some point. And the sewing community is actually really helpful- just ask!

Now that I’m 19, I’ve gotten over my fear of sewing. I’m not the most skilled sewer, I haven’t been professionally trained or anything, but I am so excited to sew my new dress! And if it goes wrong, who cares, that’s what unpickers are for!

I cannot wait to start this new project and discover new skills along the way. Have any of you guys got any projects on the go? Or questions about sewing? Let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear from you all.

Best wishes, Maddie.